Crouse Hospital

736 Irving Avenue / Syracuse, NY
315-470-7582

General Surgery Conditions

Surgical Conditions

Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery is an option for patients who are severely obese to help them with weight loss. There are several different types of bariatric surgery, that include adjustable gastric band, roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic Diversion with a Duodenal Switch, and vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

Gastrectomy (Stomach Cancer Surgery)

Gastrectomy is a surgery to remove part of the stomach affected by cancerous tumors, or to treat bleeding, inflammation, or polyps.

Hernia Repair

A hernia is a result of the abdominal muscles weakening and forming a sac when the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area. If surgery is necessary, the tear or bulging of the abdominal lining will be repaired. Talk with your doctor about the different options for surgery to repair the hernia.

Cholecystectomy (gallbladder surgery)

A Cholecystectomy is the removal of the gallbladder due to gallstones that are causing infection or pain. If you notice sharp pain in your abdomen, a low fever, nausea or bloating, or jaundice, talk to your doctor about the possibility of gallstones.

Nissen Fundoplication (acid reflux surgery)

GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease) is a result of stomach acid reflux that causes heartburn. Lifestyle changes and drug therapy can help ease symptoms, however surgery may be required if your GERD is severe.

Pancreatectomy

The pancreas is the first part of the small intestine and aids in food digestion. Surgery may be necessary when a tumor is found in your pancreas, whether it is benign or cancerous. Pancreatic cancer is more common in people who are obese, have a poor diet, have diabetes, have a long term exposure to certain chemical, and smoke.

Heller Myotomy (surgery for patients with Achalasia)

Achalasia, often called the swallowing disorder, affects the ability of the esophagus to move food to the stomach. Surgery may be required to decrease the pressure on the lower part of the esophagus. Symptoms of Achalasia are regurgitation, chest pain and heartburn, cough, difficulty swallowing, and unintentional weight loss.

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